Shefali Razdan Duggal

"Look to this day for it is life. In its brief course lie all the realities and truths of existence. The joy of growth, the glory of action, the splendor of beauty...
Today well-lived makes every yesterday a memory of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope. Look well, therefore, to this day." ~ Ancient Sanskrit Proverb

About

SHEFALI RAZDAN DUGGAL is a member of the Democratic National Committee’s National Finance Committee and is a Co-Chair for the DNC Women’s Leadership Forum. Shefali is a Presidential Appointee (President Barack Obama) to the United States Holocaust Memorial Council, which oversees the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C., for a term expiring January 15, 2018. Shefali also serves on the Rules Committee for the 2016 Democratic National Convention (Philadelphia PA). She is also on the National Finance Committee for Hillary for America (the Hillary Clinton 2016 Presidential Campaign; Leadership Committee, Women of Color for Hillary). Shefali is on the National Board of Directors for Emily’s List (an organization dedicated to electing pro-choice Democratic women to all levels of government) & is a member of the Democratic National Committee’s Hope Institute Board (a network of supporters willing to serve as mentors to Hope Fellows as they explore careers in politics). Shefali is also on the National Advisory Board of Beyond Bollywood (Smithsonian Museum), the National Advisory Board of Inside Washington (Miami University), Senior Advisor for South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA) & an Advisor to viiv.tv. Shefali is involved within various U.S. Senate and Congressional campaigns throughout the country.

Shefali was a member of the Credentials Standing Committee for the 2012 Democratic National Convention and was an At-Large Delegate to the Convention from the State of California. In addition, Shefali was active in Senator Barack Obama’s 2008 Presidential campaign, where she was a Trustee for the DNC South Asian American Leadership Council. She previously worked with Senator Hillary Clinton’s 2008 Presidential campaign, where she was a member of the campaign’s Northern California Steering Committee and the Women for Hillary Committee. Shefali was also on the Finance Committee for the Kamala Harris for California Attorney General Campaign and was a member of her Transition Team. In addition, Shefali was Executive Director of Indus Women Leaders, a national South Asian women’s organization, and was both a graduate and on the Advisory Board of Emerge California (a political leadership training program for Democratic women), . Shefali was also a Board Member of the Indian American Leadership Initiative (an organization focused on promoting South Asian political participation) and on the National Advisory Board of Doctors for America. She also served on the Dinner Committee for Human Rights Watch for several years.

Earlier in her career, Shefali worked as a Political Analyst at Staton Hughes, a political strategy firm, and also worked for the MA Democratic Party, NH Democratic party, and Senators Ted Kennedy and Dianne Feinstein. Shefali worked on Vice President Al Gore’s 2000 Presidential Campaign, and was an an At-Large Delegate to the 2000 National Democratic Convention from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

A Kashmiri born in Hardiwar U.P. India, Shefali moved to the United States at a very young age and grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio. Shefali is a graduate of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, having received a B.S. in Mass Communication, with a minor in Political Science. Shefali then went on to receive her M.A. in Political Communication from New York University. Shefali and her husband, Rajat, have two children and live in San Francisco, California.

 

I am committed to political advocacy. My goal is to inspire others to become politically involved—and through my own actions and deeds attempt to show that each person can make a difference within their own community simply by engaging in the political process. On a personal level, I believe that the South Asian community, though successful in so many different ways in the United States, has not yet fully embraced the political process and the opportunities it can provide us and, most importantly, our children. We come from the region with the most populous democracy in the world, to the United States, arguably the greatest democracy in the world. I hope to do my small part in helping to bridge these two democracies and invigorate the South Asian community to become increasingly involved and devoted to the political process.

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